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Friday, August 4, 2017

Cross Burst Granny - GrannySpiration Challenge

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  For this month's GrannySpiration Challenge, I have a versatile project for you! As soon as I started making a few washcloths with this pattern, I knew I wanted to make something else with this square. The texture of the double crochet cross stitch is so amazing when worked in the round, and a group of these squares together is absolutely stunning. I simply added a long chain in one corner to create a hanging loop for a washcloth, and you could do the same. Or, skip the loop and create a bunch of regular squares to be joined for any project you like:

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  Whether you're looking for a luxurious-feeling washcloth, a dishcloth with extra scrubbing power, or a square to join into a blanket, this pattern is sure to please. A burst of double crochet cross stitches around the center combine with a beginning and end of simple stitches, and it all results in one of those "I can't stop running my hand over this awesome texture" sensations. Lacy and pretty enough to create an heirloom baby blanket, but rough enough (in the yarn I used) to scrub the worst grime off of a construction worker... Believe me, I know because I married one. 😉 I could mention more about "texture", "awesome texture", or "the coolest texture ever", but maybe we should get on with the pattern before I talk too much about texture... Oh, wait... I forgot about reversible texture:

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*After the pattern, be sure to check out what everyone else in the Challenge is creating. You can also share your granny-inspired projects at the linkup - And don't forget to enter the giveaway, too!*


Skill level:
Easy - intermediate


Materials:
Worsted weight (4) yarn
I used Peaches & Creme cotton yarn in the color "Happy Go Lucky". Click here and also here to read why I'm not happy with it.
Size J/10 - 6.00 mm crochet hook
Yarn needle
Stitch markers (optional - use to mark corners and beginning spaces if needed)


Gauge:
In 4" x 4" (10 cm x 10 cm)
14 double crochet across
6 rows


Notes:
Chain 1 at beginning of rounds does not count as a stitch. (Chain 2 if you find this to be too short.)

Single crochet (used to join) counts as a chain-1 space at the end of rounds.

When following the chart, join rounds with a slip stitch unless otherwise noted in the diagram.


Stitches:
(American terms)
Chain
Slip stitch
Single crochet
Double crochet
Double crochet cross stitch


Instructions:

Begin with a magic circle/loop.

Round 1:
Chain 1 (does not count as a stitch), make 12 double crochet in the ring. Join with a slip stitch. 
(12 double crochet)

Round 2:
Chain 1, make one double crochet cross stitch in the space between each double crochet. Join with a slip stitch to the first double crochet made of the beginning cross stitch. 
(12 double crochet cross stitches)

Round 3:
Chain 1. 
*1 double crochet cross stitch in the chain-1 space of the next cross stitch; 1 double crochet cross stitch in the space between cross stitches. Join with a slip stitch.
(24 double crochet cross stitches)

Round 4:
Chain 1. Make 1 double crochet cross stitch in the chain space of the next cross stitch (makes beginning of first corner; to be finished at end of round). Chain 1.  
*(Work 1 double crochet cross stitch in the chain space of the next cross stitch) 5x.**
Make 2 double crochet cross stitches in the next.*
Repeat from * to * 3x.
Repeat from * to ** once more.
Make a double crochet cross stitch in the beginning space. Join with a single crochet (counts as chain-1 space) in the first double crochet of the starting double crochet cross stitch.

Round 5:
Chain 1. Make 2 double crochet in the joining space.
*Chain 1. (Double crochet in the space between next 2 cross stitches, chain 1) 6x.**
(2 double crochet, 1 chain, 2 double crochet) in the corner space.*
Repeat from * to * 3x.
Repeat from * to ** once more.
Make 2 double crochet in the beginning space. Join with a single crochet in the starting double crochet.

Round 6:
(Note - Pattern is written for a regular square. To create a hanging loop for a dishcloth or washcloth, simply replace the chain-1 of any corner in this round with more chains, then slip stitch in the top of the previous double crochet made. My loops are made with a chain of ten.)

Chain 1. Make 2 double crochet in the single crochet joining space.
*Make 2 double crochet in each of the following 7 spaces.**
(2 double crochet, 1 chain, 2 double crochet) in the corner space.*
Repeat from * to * 3x.
Repeat from * to ** once more.
Make 2 double crochet in the beginning space. Chain 1, bind off loosely. 

Join with a false stitch by bringing the tail through the starting stitch, then back through the top of the ending stitch. Weave in ends.


chart, cotton, crochet, diagram, dishcloth, double crochet cross stitch, free pattern, giveaway, granny square, Granny-Spiration Challenge 2017, in the round, linkup, square, washcloth

chart, cotton, crochet, diagram, dishcloth, double crochet cross stitch, free pattern, giveaway, granny square, Granny-Spiration Challenge 2017, in the round, linkup, square, washcloth


chart, cotton, crochet, diagram, dishcloth, double crochet cross stitch, free pattern, giveaway, granny square, Granny-Spiration Challenge 2017, in the round, linkup, square, washcloth

Happy Crocheting!

And now, on to the Granny-Spiration Challenge for August...

Check out this month's featured project - A scrap ottoman cover from Ghemuletul Incalcit:


http://ghemuletulincalcit.blogspot.ro/2017/06/normalitate.html

*A little help would be great here... Does that actually translate into "The Ghost Squirrel", or has my translator program gone bonkers? Either way, the translator doesn't have to work for me to know I love this project!

See what everyone in the Challenge is making:






Share your granny-inspired projects at the linkup:
This month's linkup begins at 12 a.m. EST on August 5th and runs until 12 a.m on August 18th.

New Granny-Spiration Projects will be shared from your hosts the first Saturday of each month. Post times will vary. You will be able to link up from 12:00am EST on the first Saturday of the month, through midnight EST on the second Thursday from the start date - specific dates are on top of the Rafflecopter form - giving you almost two weeks to link up and enter the giveaway!

Please share projects that are family friendly, and GRANNY INSPIRED through use of regular granny square or solid granny square, granny stitch pattern or other afghan square in the form of a free pattern, pattern review, or inspiration piece. Not limited to crochet or knit.

Please make sure to link to your post, and not your home page.

*If you don't have a blog, you can still share with us by creating a Free Flickr Account - powered by Yahoo. Add your projects there, and then come back here with the link for the project.

*Link ups cannot be to Etsy listings or Ravelry pages where patterns are sold. You can link to blog posts, Flickr or Facebook pages, Pins, etc that are directed towards it, but can't directly link to it.
To be clearer though, Raverly pages of finished projects are okay to share. Sorry for the inconvenience! That's per InLinkz guidelines. Thanks!

Features may be chosen at the discretion of each host. By linking up, you give us permission to feature your item.







And don't forget to enter the giveaway:
This month's giveaway is sponsored by EyeLoveKnots. One winner will receive a copy of Happily Hooked Magazine, issue #40 featuring light and lacy designs, including the pattern for Alexandra's Granny Square Tank Top.

Granny Square Top, Happily Hooked Magazine issue #40, EyeLoveKnots, giveaway, win





How to Sew a Toggle Button

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  Wait... WHAT??? Me, the sewing hater, is going to teach you something about it? Yup, that's right! Unfortunately, crocheting sometimes involves sewing, which is something I absolutely despise having to do. But, hey... We can hate it, or we can just get over it and do it so we have a finished project already; right? I find toggle buttons to be one of the easiest closures to use for garments, and I'd like to show you how I (the sewing hater) make it even easier.

  You'll need a yarn or sewing needle (one that fits through your button holes), a small length of yarn or thread (plus scissors to cut it), and your crochet project. But most importantly, toggle buttons are required... Which leads to a side note: WHOOP! The local Michaels heard my plea, and now has a larger assortment of buttons available. YAY - No more out-of-town trips just to get buttons!

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  I'm also using stitch markers to mark where I will attach the button and closing loop, but we won't need our crochet projects just yet... You're going to start with the yarn (or thread) looped over, so you need to cut double the length you actually need to sew the button. I've started with 16" (40 cm), which will give me a little less than 8" (20 cm) to work with once doubled:

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  The beginning stitch is one of the things I hate the most about sewing. That's why we're going to do this the easy way... Bring the two loose ends of the thread through the eye of the needle. You'll have a loop on one side, and the tails on the other:

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  You can move the needle closer to the tails to give yourself more thread for sewing, as shown below. Bring the needle through the back side of one of the button's holes, leaving the looped thread protruding from the back of the button:

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  Bring the needle through the front side of the other hole, to the back again. I like to leave a little slack so I don't accidentally pull the thread back out of the button until it's secured:

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  To secure the thread, bring the needle through the loop at the back of the button:

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  With the thread secured to the button, there's no fighting with trying to keep the button in the right place as you attach it to your project! You can tighten up the stitch at this point, but I still leave it a little loose for the following step...

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  To give me a bit more confidence that the button won't fall off, I run the yarn through the button's holes one more time in the same direction. (You can skip that if you have more faith in your work - or its wearer - but I like to have more than one length of yarn through it.) Now with the thread at the back of the needle again, bring it under the yarn that runs through the opposite hole:

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  There, that looks about right! (In a few steps, you'll see how I run the yarn through one more time for even more security.) Now, to grab your crochet project to attach the button...

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  I have the extra trouble of trying to attach this button to lace - Oh! Why have I taken this on? Anyway, it's no big deal, really...

  For a solid-stitch fabric, you can sew your yarn around the stitches to the back of your work. For this lacy design, I'm working through the middle of the single crochet stitch:

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  Bring the yarn back around to the front, then run under the loops at the back of the button once again:

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  I want to have a little space between the fabric and the toggle, but not too much! Here's where you can tighten your stitches to place the button where you want it:

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  Now for the super-cheating-extra-security part! I separate the tails, leaving just one on the needle:

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  Run one tail through a button hole from back to front, then through the other hole to the back again. Drop the tail from the needle and repeat with the next...

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  And then, tie the tails together in a knot.(?) It's against my crocheting morals to tie a knot in my yarn, but I really like the extra security with this lacy design. Tied tight at the back of the button, the knot blends in well:

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  It's now safe to weave the tails into the project. Again because of the lace, I'm taking an extra-security step... All tails are being woven into the yarn itself, Russian-join style:

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  If you've seen my previous tutorial for this stitch, then you know I was using a super-big hook to work up super-fine yarn... This isn't the case for the loop I created for the closure - That would never work! I switched to a smaller size 0/3.75 mm steel hook, and made a chain of ten to fit around the toggle:

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  Ta da! I did it! I sewed something and actually finished it! Now, I just hope this tutorial can also make it easier for you. I may be an advanced crocheter, but I'm an inexperienced sewer. I fear my stitches looking sloppy; my back-stitches not holding; my buttons falling off. I took the experience I gained in learning how to make a shawl toggle to make sewing on a button less of a headache. It made the task seem effortless compared to the usual way I would do it. I think - just maybe - I might look forward to using this method for more garments in the future.

Happy Crocheting!
...And effortless sewing!

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