Saturday, December 5, 2015

Hooks with a History - Susan Bates






  In all of the "vintage" hooks I brought home from my mom's, there's only one Susan Bates. I immediately thought this must be an ancient hook, because of the price stamped on the flat. I automatically figured that hunting down any history of it would be just as hard as the last time... But my research led me right where I needed to go, and I only have one hook to put a date to. This went quickly enough that I have time to give you a good laugh:




vintage, crochet hooks, Susan Bates





  Before any seriousness, let's all chuckle about the dumb things I do sometimes... As I stared at this hook prior to any research, I thought it was aluminum. But then I noticed what was printed on the opposite side of the flat: "SIZE 4 OR E". Now, my eyes saw that as "size 4/ore". So, I'm sitting here, like an idiot, thinking: What kind of ore? There's all kinds of metal ores, so what is it made of? Thankfully, my eyes stopped tricking me and I soon noticed that the "E" is bigger than the "or". *Face palm*!! Dummy! It's "SIZE 4, or... E, and yes, it's aluminum! Glad I figured that out before I told anybody... Oh wait, I just told you... Shh... Okay?


vintage, crochet hooks, Susan Bates





  Anyways, let's see if I can feel smarter again... Before I dig into the research, let's cover what I already know: Susan Bates hooks are famous for their patented inline heads, which means the head of the hook is in line with the shaft. This produces a sharper angle in the throat, which some claims helps to catch the yarn. Personally, I find that inline hooks tend to increase the issue of yarn splitting, but I'm addicted to hooks with a tapered head. Which do you prefer?


crochet hooks, Susan Bates, in-line head





  Now, on to the history: Originally C. J. Bates and Son, the company began when Carlton Joseph Bates bought the business from his employer. From the age of fourteen, C. J. Bates started working for the firm of Tyler and Post in 1861. Post bought out his partner and a company called Griswolds in 1865, then Carlton Bates bought the business from Post in 1873. The company continued to manufacture items from bone and ivory such as manicure tools and, of course, crochet hooks. In 1893, Carlton Bates fell seriously ill. His son Hamilton took over the business and held the position of chief executive until he retired in 1954.




  Needlework tools from Bates originally had no brand marked on them, or they were marked with a private label. It wouldn't be until the 1930's when the company started using its own brands, Chester and Barbara Bates. (I assume Chester was for the original location in Chester, Connecticut.) In the 1940's, the brand Chester was changed to Zephr, and Barbara Bates to Susan Bates.




  Okay, so that quickly narrows down the search for the age of my hook. Susan Bates wouldn't have been stamped on it until the 1940's or later. Like most other companies, C.J. Bates and Son experienced a halt in production during that time due to World War II. Further searching of products led me to identify this hook as part of the "Silvalume" line, which (as far as I can tell) wasn't introduced until the 1960's. Although I can't find any information to an exact date of when the price was stamped on the flat, I now know that this hook isn't really an antique. A real "Susan Bates" antique wouldn't be made of metal at all, or be stamped with "Susan Bates".


vintage, crochet hooks, Susan Bates





  But just like the rest, it's still vintage to me. Coats and Clark now owns the name, and hooks are no longer manufactured in America. You won't find any new hooks with this stamp of "Made in U.S.A.", and you definitely can't buy them for 29 cents. I couldn't dig up a list of patent dates; I didn't find any other hooks like it on eBay or Etsy. I'm not going to worry about stressing to put an exact date to this hook. It's special just like the rest, no matter what it's true age is. Since this hook is all by itself in my bunch of "vintage" hooks, it seems lonely to me. I'm gonna stop working to dig up it's history and show it some love... As soon as I stop splitting my yarn with this in-line head. This is supposed to be easier? :)


crochet hooks, in-line head, Susan Bates, yarn splitting




*I have to extend a big, huge THANK YOU to Lace Buttons! All company history came from this page: https://lacebuttons.com/?page_id=5340




Happy Crocheting!





8 comments:

  1. I prefer Susan Bates hooks because I can crochet faster with them. I've noticed that yarn seems to split with both brands of hooks. It all depends on purrsonal comfort and preference.
    I really like reading your blog. Keep up the good work!

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    1. I think I may just be inexperienced with in-line head hooks! I chose to practice with a yarn that tends to split, and I had an even harder time working with it. But switching to a yarn that doesn't usually split, I still split it! I do like the lesser wrist motion with the in-line head, so I'll just keep practicing. :)

      And omg, I'm so glad you stopped by! I profile-stalked you back to your blog, and boy, can I use some Tunisian crochet help.

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  2. Awesome! I'd love to help however I can.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I'm (sigh) just perfecting my tension while practicing short rows. I finally made a row that's not crooked, lol! Once I graduate the simple stitch, buy a real Tunisian hook, and actually make a pattern, I can't wait to learn that lace. But... I think I have a lot of "graduating" to do.

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    2. Which lace? Vintage lace?
      I prefer the cabled bamboo Tunisian hooks by Chiagoo. They're shorter but the cable takes care of the length and does not bump into your furniture as you work! (I had that problem with the traditional Tunisian hooks).
      Don't forget to watch Kim Guzman's videos about Tunisian on YouTube. She's awesome.

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    3. Yes, that vintage lace is awesome. But, that's my goal for the future, lol. I had no idea how much different Tunisian crochet was until I started learning, and never expected it to take me this long. I really appreciate your help!

      Perhaps getting a real Tunisian hook would be better; I keep dropping my stitches off the regular hook I'm working with, and the short hook doesn't leave much room to practice.

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  3. This is one place that you can get the flexible cabled hooks:
    http://www.walmart.com/search/?query=chiagoo%20tunisian%20hooks&cat_id=0

    Like I said, the cable takes care of the length of your project, it might take a little getting used to. I like how the bamboo hook is nice and light.

    Here's some info that Kim Guzman has collected about Tunisian hooks so far: http://kimguzman.com/blog/tunisian-crochet/hooks/

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    Replies
    1. Affordable suggestions; I love it! Thank you again. I do love bamboo, but I prefer tapered head hooks... Now I have some deciding to do.

      I've bookmarked the page you provided and started following Kim Guzmans's blog. I have a feeling I'll be Tunisian crocheting in no time!

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Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoyed your time, and feel free to ask questions.