Thursday, September 29, 2016

Doily for a Coffee Maker

  September 29th is National Coffee Day in the United States and many other countries. And just two days from that, October 1st is officially International Coffee Day! Of course, I had to make an extra pot of coffee to celebrate this day. And when I did, I noticed a project that I neglected to share! So I dug through my files, found the pictures, and almost deleted them because they are horrible... It was another thunderstorm-y day, so please excuse the lighting.


  I don't think this piece is particularly pretty, and it looks quite weird by itself. But this doily has an important purpose! (I also neglected to write the post about my little "coffee station" over on the other blog, so I'll clue you in here.) One day during a thunderstorm, I sat staring at the bins of my yarn stash that I've shoved against a bad spot in the wall. That stack of mismatched bins... Well now, that didn't look much better! I've also wanted to get my coffee maker off my dinner table for awhile. Would it be possible to turn the stack of bins into a coffee station?

coffee, crochet, free pattern, jute, twine, doily

  It took some work, but... Yes! I was able to stabilize the bins enough to make them safe for the coffee maker. Hidden with a tablecloth held in place with some twine, it looks a little cheesy, but it's better than bins hiding a scratched-up wall. I worried about the heat of the maker on the plastic lid, so I tested it out.(Yay, more coffee!) It got a bit warm over two hours, but not hot. I decided that a heat-shielding doily that could provide some airflow would be good, just in case.

coffee, crochet, free pattern, jute, twine, doily



  I usually record all my patterns in typical form, but this one is more like a photo tutorial. There's no list of materials and I didn't record the gauge or actual size. I just grabbed my twine, a size J/10 - 6.00 MM hook, and a camera, created a rectangular doily that will fit under most 12-cup coffee makers. Although I'm doubtful of how many people will want to make this pattern, I do think the first few rounds of the doily would make some cute coasters. Maybe it will prove to be inspiration for a different project!

coffee, crochet, free pattern, jute, twine, doily

  I'm not sure how much material went into the doily, but I started with a 350-ft roll that was partially used, and still had over half of it left when done. A 100-foot (30 m) roll should be enough.

  Most of this pattern consists of single crochet and chain stitches. The half double crochet, double crochet, and triple crochet will also be required for joining. The last round is made of double crochet and chain stitches.

doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Begin by chaining 6 and joining into a ring with a slip stitch. Chain 1. Make 11 single crochet in the ring. Not counting the beginning chain-1 as a stitch, join to the first single crochet with a slip stitch.


doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 2: Chain 1, single crochet in the same space. (Chain 2, single crochet in the next stitch) around. Only chain 1 before the beginning single crochet, and join in that stitch with a single crochet.

For the next round, chain 1, and single crochet in the space made by the joining single crochet.

*Until the last round, each round will begin with (chain 1, single crochet in the joining space).
But the joining stitch will change at the end of the round, so pay attention!
From here until round 6, you will always have 11 chain spaces.

 

doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 3: (Chain 3, single crochet in the next chain-2 space) around. Chain 1 and join in the beginning chain space with a half-double crochet.

 Round 4: (Chain 4, single crochet in the next chain space) around. Chain 1 and join in the beginning chain space with a double crochet.

*This would be a good place to stop for a coaster, or maybe even the round before. The next round makes the piece into more of a trivet, fitting under my coffee pot.


doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 5: (Chain 5, single crochet in the next chain space) around. Chain 2 and join in the beginning chain space with a double crochet.

*The next round would not be a good place to end the pattern! This round gets a little messy-looking, setting up to turn the piece into a rectangle.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 6: Chain 3 after the beginning single crochet, single crochet in the same space. [(Single crochet, chain 3) twice, single crochet] in each chain space around. Single crochet once more in the same space as the beginning single crochet. Chain 1 and join with a half double crochet.

*Now you'll have 22 chain spaces.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 7: Chain 12, skip two chain-3 spaces, single crochet in the next. Chain 12, skip one chain space, single crochet in the next. This makes part of the first short side of the rectangle.


doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Continuing round 7: *(Chain 4, single crochet in the next chain-3 space) 4 times.* This makes the first long side of the rectangle.
(Chain 12, skip one chain-3 space, single crochet in the next. Chain 12, skip two chain-3 spaces, single crochet in the next. Chain 12, skip one chain space, single crochet in the next) to create the next short side.
Repeat from * to * for the final long side. Chain 6, skip the last chain-3 space. Join in the beginning chain space with a triple crochet.
I know that only equals 'chain 10' for the final space, but making an extra 2 chains caused too big a gap! I did hit a thin spot in my twine at that point, so go ahead and chain 8 before the join if yours is short.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 8: Chain 3, single crochet in the same space. (Chain 3, single crochet) 4 times in the next space.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Continuing round 8: *(Chain 3, single crochet) 5 times in the corner space.*
**(Chain 3, single crochet in the next space) 4 times.**
Work from * to * for next corner.
Work from ** to ** for next side.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Finishing round 8: (Chain 3, single crochet) 3 times in the same space as the beginning single crochet. Chain 1 and join to the beginning chain space with a half double crochet.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Round 9: Chain 2 to begin, make 2 double crochet in the space made by the half double crochet. (Chain 1, make 3 double crochet in the next space) across, until you reach the third chain-3 space of a corner.



doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
 Continuing round 9: Chain 3, make 3 double crochet in the third chain-3 space. Work (chain 1, double crochet 3 times in the next space) across for sides, and chain 3 before corners.
Make 1 double crochet in the same space as the beginning chain-2.


 
doily, twine, jute, crochet, free pattern
Skip the beginning chain-2, and join with a slip stitch in the first double crochet. Cut the twine and weave in the ends.
Because the thickness of twine can be inconsistent, some damp blocking may be required to straighten out the edges. But please, don't soak it! It took three days for me to dry a coaster made of this stuff when I soaked it in the sink.


coffee, crochet, free pattern, jute, twine, doily


  And by the way, I did make a point to put the coffee maker on the two bins I go into the least... One is actually my hardly-used sewing bin. I don't want to have to move the coffee pot each time I need a skein of yarn! The bins I work from often are only covered by a few candles that I don't burn on top of plastic.


coffee, crochet, free pattern, jute, twine, doily

   The whole setup isn't so "girly" that Rip van Winkle will complain, and I think it serves its purpose. The edges show just enough from under the coffee maker, and those big gaps provide plenty of airflow underneath. After another two hours of another pot of coffee heating, the plastic lid underneath no longer feels warm at all. Now, if only I could get Rip to wake up from that nap at the table, so I don't drink the rest of another pot all by myself...


Happy Crocheting! 
 And Happy Coffee Days!

13 comments:

  1. Hello Jenny,
    I once tried to crochet something (a cachepot for outdoor usage) with jute and gave up soon after. The material was so stubborn and unyielding it simply did not want to fold and lay the way I wanted/intended it to (maybe because I crochet pretty tight). Thus I've still got some (err... plenty of) jute in the studio. And just in case I might want to start another attempt I keep it there instead of using it in the garden... Sigh... But seeing your doily - hmmm - maybe I should give it another try...
    Have a nice weekend,
    Marjan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marjan, I've had the same experience! Tight tension definitely doesn't help, but a bigger hook size does. Could it be that not all twine is created equal? I tried to work with some thicker hemp twine before, and found it so stiff that I couldn't create anything at all with it. To the garden is exactly where it went.
      Hope you have a great weekend, too!

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  2. Jute is hard on the hands, I made a bag from it once. I love your jute doily though, it's so practical and pairs well in my head with a coffee pot. When I think doilies I think of grandma's and tea pots and this could not be further from that old fashioned image. Very modern, very cool.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The bigger hook does help to make it a little easier, but the jute is still rough to work with. I wouldn't want to tackle a big project with it.
      I didn't think of it when I created this, but you're so right: Doilies = Tea time! Maybe this is a step towards a new way of thinking.

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  3. Love that you crocheted doily out of jute making it so rustic. It is just perfect to go under your coffee maker. Thank you so much for sharing at Snickerdoodle Create~Bake~Make link party!

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    Replies
    1. I am featuring your jute doily at Snickerdoodle Create~Bake~Make link party today!

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    2. Ooo, I better get to the party then! I'm just getting back after Hurricane Matthew, so this is such a nice surprise. Thanks a bunch, Sharon!

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  4. Looks so pretty!

    I would love for you to share this with my Facebook Group for recipes, crafts, tips, and tricks: https://www.facebook.com/groups/pluckyrecipescraftstips/

    Thanks for joining Cooking and Crafting with J & J!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jess! I'd be happy to pop over and check out what's going on in the group!

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  5. What a lovely little doily! It's rustic and cute at the same time and it's just perfect for the coffee maker!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Katrin! It has proven to be a great accessory to the coffee maker.

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  6. This is a great coffee pot holder. It's gorgeous.


    Thank you for sharing this with us on the #HomeMattersParty. We hope to see you again next Friday when we open our doors at 12 AM EST.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoyed your time, and feel free to ask questions.